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Archive for August 2010

Keeping up with construction at Seattle Children’s

Starting in September we will post construction updates on this blog to help our neighbors and patient families know what to expect around the project site.

We will begin to prepare the site for our expansion starting in September. And we understand that this work is particularly important to those who live near us. We will do our best to minimize the impact to our neighbors. Read full post »

Green Spaces Heal Body and Soul

By Guest Blogger Jeff Hughes, Grounds and Sustainability Manager at Children’s

This path currently borders the hospital on the West side, just above where Laurelon Terrace is now. We’ll be incorporating more places like this, where the public can stroll, relax and take a breather from the stress of the hospital or whatever’s happening in their day.

A hospital isn’t just a building, or a facility. When done right, a hospital can be a living, breathing, thriving community. At its best, it’s a circle of hope, healing, strength and spirit. Here at Children’s, the healing power of nature has always played a role in that, and we’ll continue this tradition as we grow. Read full post »

The First Phase of Seattle Children’s Hospital Expansion

Here is a rendering showing what the Seattle Children’s Hospital campus may look like in 2013. The proposed design features neutral stones, glass and metal – chosen to complement the current architecture and park-like surroundings. The first phase of construction, scheduled to begin in early 2011, will be lower in elevation than the tallest existing building on campus.

Last April, the Seattle City Council gave the expansion a green light. Since then, hospital planners and architects from Zimmer Gunsul Frasca have worked to meet requirements of the Master Plan including height limits, setback standards, and open space requirements. Read full post »

It’s all About the Patient Experience

Staff and patient families helped design our proposed interior spaces. We recently conducted a facility design event with life-sized mockups to understand the patient experience. Nearly 150 staff, patients and families toured full-size patient room models to offer feedback on the proposed design.

The majority of patients who are admitted to Children’s are admitted from the Emergency Department to the Medical Unit. The team tracked this flow of patients and their experiences and determined this was a key starting point to select services and adjacencies. We wanted the distance traveled for patients to be very short. Another important decision was to plan for decreased travel distance between the Surgical Unit and the operating rooms. Read full post »

Why Does Seattle Children’s Hospital Need to Expand?

We have been at or near capacity for the last few years. So, we turned to a management philosophy called Continuous Performance Improvement (CPI) to help us accommodate more patients and we were able to serve 38,000 patients last year, up from 27,000 in 2004 without expanding.

But, even with that increased capacity we still reached the limits of our facility and had to divert some patients who needed our care to other hospitals.  There is nothing worse, as a parent, than finding out the hospital meant for children is full and unable to admit your child. All of us at Children’s owe it to the children of the Northwest to have a bed available when they need it. Read full post »